The Coffee Exporter’s Guide THIRD EDITION

The Coffee Exporter’s Guide THIRD EDITION

Nu Buna Tetoo ❤❤❤ Ethiopian coffee drinking culture .Ethiopian cultural hospitality that’s been passed from generation to generation.

Ethiopia’s coffee drinking culture, like its citizenry, is diverse. As anywhere else, people drinks coffee is part of culture, to get relaxation of a moment, to have chats with friends and neighbors, and some people drink coffee for health reason: Doctor’s recommendation. From the Ethiopian contexts, however, Ethiopian drinking coffee habit is part of culture and has ability to help people connected each other and it is a traditional tool to solve their community social problems.

In some Ethiopian country side, for instance, where arranged marriage is practiced, the coffee ceremony is sometimes used as a way of choosing marriage mates and means of proofing their son’s fiancée or a future daughter-in-law if she makes a real good coffee, if she is a well trained traditional food maker, if she is a responsible person to take care of her husband and her entire families is a strong indication of being a good wife.

Coffee drinking with friends and neighbors gathering moment has also the under stated purposes: It is used as a communication forum to share local news, gossip, social affairs, neighborhood concerns, solidarity, counseling and meditations over the coffee steaming.

Drinking coffee with neighbors is a traditional hospitality for Ethiopian societies. Therefore, when one family makes coffee, neighbors’ or friends’ are expected to come to drink coffee is considered a mark of friendship or mutual respect and is an important example of Ethiopian cultural hospitality that’s been passed from generation to generation.

When one make coffee, they send their male child messenger to go and knock on their neighbor’s door to invite them ”Nu Buna Tetoo” come join us for coffee drinks, is an invitation common verbal neighbor-to-neighbor communication slogan and the invitee will reciprocate later that day. It’s a tradition steeped in a community.

By Kebede HAILE

 

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